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Haunted attraction | CO | Capital Prize Gold Mine Tours

"The newest attraction in Clear Creek County and the longest and most extensive gold mine in Colorado. This mine is different than all the others and is a must see. Only 35min. from Denver!

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Georgetown Courier December 29 1917 p1 c3

 

Fatal Accident at Onondaga Mines

 

About eight o'clock Monday morning Dick Allander came out of the Onondaga mines workings through the Capital tunnel and although almost prostrated from the effects of bad air he managed to give the alarm to the men in the blacksmith shop that his partners were inside and in very bad shape on the 300-foot level above the main tunnel. Allander then went back in to see if he could help them in any way.

 

Dr. Kirby was telephoned for by Ed Bauman, the alarm quickly spread through town and nearly 100 men were promptly at the mine to render assistance. many rumors were circulated, one being that the tunnel had caved, shutting in the men, so that many who went to the rescue were prepared with lamps and in working clothes to do what they could.

 

Allender said he had left J. D. Iverson hanging on the ladder about 165 feet above the tunnel level, and that the other man, a stranger by the name of Gants, was up in the level. When the rescuers got to the mill hole it was found that Iverson had fallen off the ladder, evidently striking the rail with his head, as the back of it was cut and crushed. He was dead when reached. Allander was then brought out by the motor and taken home, very weak from his experience. A search was then made for Gants who was found near the top of the mill hole. The turning on of the air valve by Allander probably saved his life.

 

The mill hold was situated about a mile and a half from the mouth of the Capital tunnel, so that it took some time to reach the men, especially as the compressors had not been running, having been shot down for Christmas. Ed Bauman, manager of the Capital, promptly started the compressors pumping air.

 

The men during the week previous had complained of the air being bad when the compressors were running, so that it seems to have been the height of folly on their part to work when they were shut down....

 

Georgetown Courier January 27 1917 p1 c3

 

Accident at Kane Adit

 

Nels Nelson, a Dane, aged about 30, was probably injured beyond recovery at the Kane adit on Thursday evening. Nelson was working in the shaft when he was struck on the head by a rock falling from above the sheave wheel. The skull was crushed and there is little hope of his recovery. He was brought to town and taken to the St. Andrews house. In addition to being tied, it requires the exertions of two men to handle him in his semi-conscious moments. Nelson came to America three or four years ago, and to Georgetown about the first of January.